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Translator rates calculator



The rates / fees a freelance translator needs to charge depend on various factors, including the speed at which he or she works, the income he or she desires, work-related expenses and so on. Use the online calculator below to determine your own minimum rates, given your working speed, expenses and lifestyle objectives.

Please enter your information
年間経費1:
希望する年収2:
一週間に仕事に費やす時間:
仕事に費やす時間のうち翻訳作業の占める割合: %
一時間に翻訳できるワード数4 の平均3:
年間の休暇週数:
Instructions for using this calculator:

a )すべての貨幣が使用できます。結果は使用した貨幣で出ます。

b)経費は一年の総計を入力してください。この欄にはハードウェア、ソフトウェア、インターネット接続費、事務所費、事業保険料、会費、税金、教育費、セミナー代などが含まれます。

c)希望する年収を入力してください。この金額は生活費、貯金、個人保険料、可処分所得などを含みます。税引き前の金額です。

d)一週間に翻訳の仕事に何時間費やすかを入力してください。

e)仕事をする時間のうち、実際に翻訳作業に費やす時間は何パーセントか入力してください。コミュニケーション(メール、電話、チャットなど)、見積もり、レイアウト、ファイルやドキュメントの準備と処理、料金請求、経理、マーケティング、所用、教育関連、休憩などの、翻訳作業以外の時間を考慮することを忘れないでください。

注:8時間の労働時間のうち、2時間を翻訳以外の仕事に費やした場合は、翻訳作業に費やした時間の割合は8分の6=75%となります。

f)CATツールの使用や他の条件を考慮したうえで、一時間に翻訳できる平均ワード数を入力してください。

ワード数以外の単位(行、ページ数、字数など)で入力することも可能です。結果は使用した単位で表示されます。

翻訳作業を妨げる要素はすでに考慮されているので、翻訳作業のみに専念できる平均的な時間の純生産量を入力してください。

g)一年間に取る休暇を週単位で入力してください。これはバケーションだけではなく、大会、セミナー、会議など、仕事ができない日にちも含みます。

h)「提出」ボタンをクリックすると、あなたが一年間に翻訳するワード数と、希望するレベルの所得を得るために請求すべき料金レートが表示されます。平均スピードより早く、または遅くなると思われる案件の場合は、料金の調節をする必要があるかもしれません。

i)結果の下にふたつのリンクが表示されます。ひとつめのリンクはあなたのプロフィールの料金のページに移動します。ふたつめは、サイト全体の平均レートを示すページです。言語ペアごとに表示されています。
Footnotes:
1.コンピューターなどのハードウェア、ソフトウェア、インターネット接続費、事務所費、事業保険料、会費、税金など。
2.生活費、貯金、個人保険料、可処分所得など。
3.CATツールの使用や他の条件を考慮したうえでの、平均ワード数またはカウント。
4.その他の単位を使用することも可能です。
5.あなたの平均的な翻訳スピードを考慮すると、このレートがあなたが請求するべき料金レートです。平均よりも早く、または遅くできる案件の場合は、このレートを調整する必要があるかもしれません。


Notes / additional sources of information on rates:

Comments

Discussion about how to set your rates as a translator.


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Translator rates calculator

l Gaston l  Identity Verified
Local time: 10:12
アフリカーンス語 から 古代ヘブライ語
+ ...
Article on determining rates and fees Jun 4, 2010

The article Determining your rates and fees as a translator is meant to provide translators with helpful tips in answering the question "What rates should I charge?"

The article is a joint project of ProZ.com members and guests; all translators are invited to contribute freely and add their experience.


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Krzysztof Kajetanowicz  Identity Verified
ポーランド
Local time: 15:12
英語 から ポーランド語
+ ...
note Jun 4, 2010

I admit that to the extent that the article compiles what most people here would say on the subject, it's a good summary.

However, I think it's a mistake to focus on the cost of living and what the translator "would like" to earn.

Economics a cruel science. Your aspirations and needs are hardly relevant. What counts are your options, as well as the client's options.

If you're not making enough, you can demand more. If the client has other options, you won't make more. If you thus find yourself unable to make enough money translating, are you able to do something else and make more?

If not, then living costs are a poor reference point. You will prefer to make too little than to make nothing. The cost of food is not a cost you have to bear in order to translate. It's a cost you'll bear regardless. If you choose between translating for little and doing nothing for nothing, unless your country has a generous unemployment benefit, you'll choose to translate for little.

If yes, very well - but then again, the cost of living is not a good reference. Rather, you look at the fact that the buyer is willing to pay because they won't get a much better deal (price/quality-wise) somewhere else.

Let the flaming begin.


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Dawn Montague  Identity Verified
Local time: 09:12
ドイツ語 から 英語
+ ...
Krzysztof is partly right, but it's not the whole story Jun 4, 2010

Although Krzysztof is partly right (the realities of economics can be cruel indeed), it is not the whole story. From experience, I can tell you that if you can deliver top notch quality and service that pleases top notch clients (and you market yourself effectively to them), you will be able to say no to the low payers. It's as simple as that. It takes time and hard work to get to that point, but it can be done. I would suggest also reading Corinne McKay's blog post entitled "Secrets of six-figure translators" at http://thoughtsontranslation.com/2008/11/12/secrets-of-six-figure-translators/, or any of Danilo Nogueira's articles on translator economics such as this one: http://www.proz.com/translation-articles/articles/298/1/Translation-Economics-101 or this one: http://www.proz.com/translation-articles/articles/327/1/-Are-you-Prepared-to-Meet-Your-Client?.

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Felipe severino jendrysiak
ブラジル
Local time: 10:12
英語 から ポルトガル語
Value your work and dictate your rates Jul 29, 2010

Hey,
I agree with Dawn,
Quality comes with price and further more agencies only offers extremely low rates and demanding top quality translations because translators accepts such imperative. Do not translate for little if you are a real qualified translator. If the professional values the career you won't subject yourself to work for little. DO NOT WORK FOR LITTLE. If everyone simply refuses to accept low payers (agencies) they will eventually rethink the way a translation work worth. If you translator prefer to work for little please do something like working in a bar. For certain that will be less distressing with less responsibility.


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AGDANE
Local time: 23:12
英語 から デンマーク語
+ ...
Yes Oct 2, 2010

Krzysztof Kajetanowicz wrote:

However, I think it's a mistake to focus on the cost of living and what the translator "would like" to earn.

Economics a cruel science. Your aspirations and needs are hardly relevant. What counts are your options, as well as the client's options.

If you're not making enough, you can demand more. If the client has other options, you won't make more. If you thus find yourself unable to make enough money translating, are you able to do something else and make more?

If not, then living costs are a poor reference point. You will prefer to make too little than to make nothing. The cost of food is not a cost you have to bear in order to translate. It's a cost you'll bear regardless. If you choose between translating for little and doing nothing for nothing, unless your country has a generous unemployment benefit, you'll choose to translate for little.

If yes, very well - but then again, the cost of living is not a good reference. Rather, you look at the fact that the buyer is willing to pay because they won't get a much better deal (price/quality-wise) somewhere else.

Let the flaming begin.


That is precisely right. The only thing that determines the price is what the buyer is willing to pay.

Although of course, in the long course living costs should theoretically affect the rate for translation, because translators being paid less that they could subside on would supposedly leave the profession (or sleep under bridges), and thereby lower supply relative to demand. However, that is not really relevant to price setting for the individual who needs the projects.

[Edited at 2010-10-02 00:23 GMT]


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jferedo  Identity Verified
Local time: 23:12
ハンガリー語 から 英語
+ ...
Felipe is absolutely right. Nov 9, 2010

Too many newcomers believe that they are translators (on the basis of speaking more than one language) and accept jobs for next to nothing. Stick to your price. If agencies want quality, they will pay the price or ask for proofreading. Never accept proofreading without seeing a sample. My long-term customers all went through this and now I have no problem (or not too much).

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Virgo Fernando
インドネシア
Local time: 20:12
英語 から インドネシア語
+ ...
good to read... Jan 2, 2011

all yours are "good sentences"... let's say I'm not so much of a good translator... and still trying to step into this translator's world, seeking hope for a better future, doing what I THINK I could do.. reading felipe's and dawn's has given me some sort of hope and self-confidence, though krzysztof's might also be right to the contexts that in the real life, things just don't go well by doing the calculation of how much do you want to earn or else... so, I'm not saying which one is preferable... all of your sentences are good to read and learn...

cheers

-V-


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John Holloway  Identity Verified
オランダ
Local time: 15:12
2010に入会
オランダ語 から 英語
+ ...
rate per hour in the calculator Jan 27, 2011

If hourly rate was included it would be handy. This also lets you see when you should stop translating and take up garbage removal or similar as the rate´s better! I think a good sign is that, provided your overheads are low (and one must remember to depreciate capital investment over 3 to 5 years), translating can deliver a livable (freelance) income - comparable, say to teaching, nursing and other (somewhat underpaid) professions. It´s a viable departure point, from which to build a (somewhat) higher income as you get better at it. As a (re-) starter in the field I find this consoling! At least it´s a field in which there´s constant demand!

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Morten Alme

英語 から ノルウェー語
Thank you for a good input May 27, 2011

Krzysztof Kajetanowicz wrote:

I admit that to the extent that the article compiles what most people here would say on the subject, it's a good summary.

However, I think it's a mistake to focus on the cost of living and what the translator "would like" to earn.

Economics a cruel science. Your aspirations and needs are hardly relevant. What counts are your options, as well as the client's options.

If you're not making enough, you can demand more. If the client has other options, you won't make more. If you thus find yourself unable to make enough money translating, are you able to do something else and make more?

If not, then living costs are a poor reference point. You will prefer to make too little than to make nothing. The cost of food is not a cost you have to bear in order to translate. It's a cost you'll bear regardless. If you choose between translating for little and doing nothing for nothing, unless your country has a generous unemployment benefit, you'll choose to translate for little.

If yes, very well - but then again, the cost of living is not a good reference. Rather, you look at the fact that the buyer is willing to pay because they won't get a much better deal (price/quality-wise) somewhere else.

Let the flaming begin.


It seems hard to put a price on words. As a freelancer new to this business, some good advice is highly appreciated....


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Samuel Murray  Identity Verified
オランダ
Local time: 15:12
2006に入会
英語 から アフリカーンス語
+ ...
At the risk of repeating what the wiki article says May 27, 2011

Moral26 wrote:
It seems hard to put a price on words. As a freelancer new to this business, some good advice is highly appreciated...


Options:

1. Charge what other people in your language combination charge (for that, you need to do some research into what other people charge).

2.1 Assume (as a beginner) that you can do 300 words per hour and that you would be busy 3 hours a day, 3 days a week, 3 weeks a month.
2.2 Decide how much money you would like to earn per month, and then multiply that by 3 (to make up for taxes, insurance, etc).
2.3 Then... then divide that amount by the number of words that you would be able to translate in that month.

3. Let your clients decide how much they want to pay. Say something like "I don't have a single rate for all clients -- why don't you start by telling me what you think is reasonable". Good agencies will offer you what is reasonable, bad agencies will take advantage of you, but either way, you'll learn a lot about money and the value of translation.

Lastly, find a good average between all of the above, play with the numbers, and adjust your expectations accordingly.

Oh, and don't forget that some clients in some countries are willing to pay more (or are unwilling to pay less) than some clients in some other countries. And don't forget that once you've asked a certain rate for a certain client, it is nearly impossible to increase it later (except a little bit).




[Edited at 2011-05-27 07:39 GMT]


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Morten Alme

英語 から ノルウェー語
Thanks for advice. May 28, 2011

Samuel Murray wrote:

Moral26 wrote:
It seems hard to put a price on words. As a freelancer new to this business, some good advice is highly appreciated...


Options:

1. Charge what other people in your language combination charge (for that, you need to do some research into what other people charge).

2.1 Assume (as a beginner) that you can do 300 words per hour and that you would be busy 3 hours a day, 3 days a week, 3 weeks a month.
2.2 Decide how much money you would like to earn per month, and then multiply that by 3 (to make up for taxes, insurance, etc).
2.3 Then... then divide that amount by the number of words that you would be able to translate in that month.

3. Let your clients decide how much they want to pay. Say something like "I don't have a single rate for all clients -- why don't you start by telling me what you think is reasonable". Good agencies will offer you what is reasonable, bad agencies will take advantage of you, but either way, you'll learn a lot about money and the value of translation.

Lastly, find a good average between all of the above, play with the numbers, and adjust your expectations accordingly.

Oh, and don't forget that some clients in some countries are willing to pay more (or are unwilling to pay less) than some clients in some other countries. And don't forget that once you've asked a certain rate for a certain client, it is nearly impossible to increase it later (except a little bit).




[Edited at 2011-05-27 07:39 GMT]


Thanks for the good advice. I saw Svens price list, and it gave me good pointers. Though I reckon medical translations are a lot more time consuming and technical than mere web content, literary or catalogue content.

Good point in letting the client put up an offer first, and then compare with the prices I already have.

I do remember being able to write about 4-6 pages a day while rewriting a short story collection a few years ago. And then I set forth to translate the main story to Norwegian. It was the same there. Between 3-6 pages a day.

I gather I would be able to do at least a 1000 to 1200 words a day on the clients projects. And I range my prices from 9 to 13 eurocents per source word.

This seems to be something that I have looked for a long time, while struggling with my own writing. Except for deadlines, you are your own boss.

Again, thanks for good advice.


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Gabriela Hebin  Identity Verified
米国
Local time: 09:12
2002に入会
スペイン語 から 英語
+ ...
300 words per hour, 3 hours a day, 3 days a week... really? Jun 11, 2011

Please, just look at the default values on this formula.

A newbie translator might see this formula and expect to support his/her family's lifestyle by translating during only 70% of their "working" time, yet expects to do so by only translating 300 words per hour. Of course he/she feels it is perfectly reasonable to expect 4 weeks a year of what amounts to a paid vacation, and then to only work for 3 hours a day, 3 days a week.

Hello??? ON WHAT PLANET can you support yourself working 3 hours a day, 3 days a week, 48 weeks a year, if you're only good enough to produce 300 words an hour?

THEN someone else chimes in agreeing that they can only manage to produce some 1000-1200 words per day, so the newbie feels justified in the presumptions.

REALITY CHECK: 1000 words per day is NOT a professional rate of production! All of the translators who I work with can produce a minimum of 4000 words per day, some of them up to 8000, so let's get real here. Step it up.

What is the amount that you are willing to earn while you sit at home in front of your lapton in your jammies?
What is the value of being able to watch your own children rather than send them off to be "cared for" by strangers?
How cool is it to be able to take a break from your emails to move your laundry from the washer to the dryer?
Or to water your garden between assignments?
What is the value of NOT having to wear a suit and tie (or nylons and heels)?
Of NOT having to commute X number of hours each week?
Of NOT having to waste the the gas and wear and tear on your car?
How amazing is it to be in touch with people from all over the world and not have to sit in some fluorescent-lit office listening to some yahoo spouting the usual office gossip and politics while you pretend to care?
And what could be better than to avoid ALL of those things and still earn MANY times more than what an office worker earns?

To me, that kind of freedom is priceless.

Please enlighten me, even in the most Socialist of societies, since when does 300 words per hour X 3 hours a day X 3 days a week constitute an effort to earn a living? A business owner always works MORE than a full-time employee, not less. Greater freedom only comes with greater responsibility.

Enough said.

I'm sure this post will create hate mail, but so what? I'm sitting at home making my own coffee and listening to the TV while I laugh at the flames from the newbies who can only translate 1000 words per day.


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Arianne Farah  Identity Verified
カナダ
Local time: 09:12
2008に入会
英語 から フランス語
I read Samuel's post another way Jun 11, 2011

@Gabriela - from what I understand of Samuel's post he's not using the 3x3x3 as what a newbie should be aiming for but rather the volume one can realistically expect to obtain at the beginning of a career, the rest of the time spent prospecting new clients and firing off CVs. If a newbie makes his calculations based on a 40-hour work week chances are he/she won't book enough work to fill those 40 hours and the budget will be way off!

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Daniel Grau  Identity Verified
アルゼンチン
英語 から スペイン語
Using a similar method to the rates calculator... Jun 11, 2011

... in this BMI chart:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Body_mass_index

I just determined I am over 2 meters tall.


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apk12  Identity Verified
ドイツ
Local time: 15:12
英語 から ドイツ語
+ ...
Oha? Costs of living irrelevant? Jun 11, 2011

Krzysztof Kajetanowicz wrote:

I admit that to the extent that the article compiles what most people here would say on the subject, it's a good summary.

However, I think it's a mistake to focus on the cost of living and what the translator "would like" to earn. ...



No, I don't agree. Economists may think what they want to think and count whatever they count. If they forget this fact - that it should be a living translator, not his skeleton - actually the costs of living in the given target language country is a cost they HAVE to embed in their calculation, the translator won't deliver a professional translation from right of his grave.

The consequences, if economists forget that, are... translations starting world trips. With expectable quality afterwards. Well...




[Edited at 2011-06-11 13:06 GMT]


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